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HBOT.COM

Giving people back their lives!

Interview with Dr. Paul Harch: The Application of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Autism and Other Chronic Neurological Conditions

visit www.autismone.orgInterview with Dr. Paul Harch:
The application of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in chronic neurological conditions

 

 

Paul G. Harch, MD and Teri Small

 

As hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) moves closer to a standard of care for many deemed ‘hopeless’ diseases it still remains a controversial and misunderstood treatment. Currently there are thirteen medical conditions approved for treatment with HBOT. But over twenty-two years of experience has shown Dr. Paul Harch astounding medical benefits when applied to diseases like Cerebral Palsy Autism, Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury, and many others. This interview explores the science behind these applications. 

Teri Small, from AutismOne Radio, and Dr. Harch talk about HBOT defined as a pharmaceutical and its pharmacologic effects in the application of HBOT to neurology, including autism. 

SPECT: Diagnostic Imaging that is Best for Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)

 Diagnostic Imaging and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

 
Drs. P.G. Harch, R.A. Neubauer, J.M. Uszler, and P.B. James

The authors of the Appendix to K. K. Jain's Textbook of Hyperberic Medicine

 

What is Diagnostic Imaging

Diagnostic imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). It is even more important in assessing the effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) on hypoxic/ischemic lesions of the brain. Various techniques that are relevant to HBOT include:

  • Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT Scan),
  • Positron Emission Tomography (PET Scan),
  • Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI),
  • Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy MR spectroscopy, or (MRS)

For practical purposes, SPECT using hexamethylpropyleneamine (HMPAO) or ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) is the most practical and widely used diagnostic procedure in combination with Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy. This technique is illustrated in this appendix.

Harch HBOT for Infant Problems with the Brain or Brain Trauma: Shaken Baby Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy CP, Infant Brain Injury

HBOT for an Infant/Child Brain Injury

According to Dr. Harch, "HBOT for infants is no different than HBOT for adults except that infants can be exquisitely sensitive to oxygen and thus, require careful dosing." In the early 1990s Dr. Harch began an investigation of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in pediatric brain injury.  Beginning with the first cerebral palsy (CP) child he applied HBOT and SPECT brain blood flow imaging (discussed below) to any child with a neurological diagnosis primarily involving the brain. What he found was that HBOT acted like a generic drug on a multitude of different brain disorders in children, including genetic disorders.

Angiogenesis: The Key to Harch HBOT Healing of a Wound

 

Angiogenesis: The Key to Hyperbaric Oxygen HBOT Therapy

by Paul Harch, M.D.

 

Researchers continue to document an increasing number of acute and chronic drug effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT).  Acutely, HBOT corrects hypoxia [oxygen deprived], reduces edema, augments WBC-mediated bacterial killing, inhibits an aerobic bacteria, and profoundly decreases reperfusion injury. In chronic wounding HBOT induced effects are trophic: fibroblast proliferation, collagen deposition, epithelialization, and angiogenesis. The latter process is the basis for HBOT generated wound healing and the topic of this HBO on the Avenue.  

ANGIOGENESIS, or new blood vessel growth, is critical to wound healing. In normal wound management with minimal tissue destruction angiogenesis occurs without problems at the wound edge where a steep oxygen gradient exists. The stimulus for angiogenesis is hypoxia at the wound edge that causes various growth factors to be released from wound macrophages. This same hypoxia is responsible for retinopathy in newborns and preemies after abrupt withdrawal of supplemental oxygen and in newborn animals subjected to hypoxic environments. Hypoxia is similarly present in chronic or non-healing wounds, but the difference is that the oxygen gradient is very shallow.  While no one has defined the exact slope of the shallow gradient, i.e. the distance over which oxygen reduction occurs in a non-healing wound, it is the usual underlying pathophysiology in most non-healing chronic wounds. Besides large vessel revascularization, to date only one therapy has been shown to consistently correct the shallow oxygen gradient and induce angiogenesis: HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY. 

The best model so far developed to study shallow perfusion gradient wounds and the one in which HBOT's angiogenesis effects have been unequivocally demonstrated is irradiated tissue. External beam radiation causes a well-defined stereotypic delayed thrombosis of small blood vessels that is maximal at the center of the beam and tapers at the edges. Marx (1) exploited this wound in animals and humans to show that HBOT caused a progressive angiogenesis at the wound margin by generating a steep oxygen gradient with intermittent repetitive HBOT. Over a course of about 30 treatments new vessel growth infiltrated the wound and achieved pO₂'s of about 85% of control tissue. Similar HBOT angiogenesis has been achieved in animals by Manson (2), Rohr (3), Meltzer (4), Nemiroff (5), Zhao (6), and others. This is the underlying basis of all HBOT in chronic wounding and accounts for the ability to heal diabetic foot wounds, arterial insufficiency ulcers, traumatic ischemic wounds, bums, and other devascularized wounds, providing major arterial supply is not severely decreased. On reverse side is an example of HBOT's angiogenesis capability.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Rehab for Brain Injury is Included as the VFW Reiterates High Priority Issues

One specific area of scientific endeavor that we strongly believe merits further exploration is Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment. The VA is on the periphery of this issue, yet the Congress and veteran service organizations have continually pressed for a thorough evaluation of this treatment. The research suggests this technology could lead to breakthroughs in treating Traumatic Brain Injuries and other serious conditions, so we urge you to support it, and to impress upon VA the need to conduct whatever research is necessary to evaluate the potential of new or existing technology as a treatment tool.”
 
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for traumatic brain injury treatment as a protocol has recently been add the House Armed Services Bill and is known as HR 396: The Traumatic Brain Injury Treatment Act. Please show your support of HR 396 by urging your White House Representative to vote YES on this issue.

Traumatic Brain Injury Treated with Low Pressure Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy and SPECT Scans Show Progressive Medical Improvement

The brain injury program is a direct outgrowth of the extensive experience of Dr. Harch treating chronically brain injured patients, the independent 22 year clinical Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy experience of Dr. Harch's practice group (Van Meter and Associates) at the Jo Ellen Smith Medical Center Hyperbaric Medicine Unit, the published reports of Drs. Richard A Neubauer and S.F. Gottlieb, and the 27 year clinical experience with brain injury of Dr. R.A Neubauer in Florida. In the late 1980's while at the Jo Ellen Smith Hyperbaric Medicine Unit, Dr. Harch observed patients with cerebral decompression sickness and/or air embolism who responded to hyperbaric oxygen therapy long after treatment of inert gas bubbles had passed or with delayed treatment months to years after standard U.S. Navy treatments had achieved partial success. In addition, Dr. Harch observed patients with brain contusion or stroke who, months to years after their neurological injury, concomitantly experienced gratuitous neurological improvement during the course of Hyperbaric Oxygen treatment for one of the standard accepted indications.

Harch HBOT in Cerebral Palsy and Pediatric Neurology: A Scientific Perspective

This article will review the current literature and history of application of low pressure (low dosage) LPHBOT to pediatric neurology. The most rigorous study on this subject will be analyzed and its interpretation debated in terms of past and present scientific data and theoretical considerations. The major flaw in the study's conclusion is illustrated by pre and post HBOT SPECT brain imaging on two of the author's cerebral palsy patients and the author's 12-year-experiehce of HBOT treatment of Cerebral Palsy children. There is substantial scientific explanation and data to argue for reimbursement of HBOT in Cerebral Palsy.

HBOT treatment for patients with Alcoholism, Drug Addiction, and Narcotic Addiction in Post-Intoxication & Abstinence Period

Hyperbaric Oxygenation in the Treatment of Patients with
Drug Addiction, Narcotic Addiction and Alcoholism
 in the Post-Intoxication and Abstinence Periods

 
[Original Article in Russian]
Epifanova NM.

H.R. 396: The Traumatic Brain Injury Treatment Act Has Been Added to the House Armed Services Bill

H.R. 396: The Traumatic Brain Injury Treatment Act Has Been Added to the House Armed Services Bill

 
 
 
On May 25, 2011, at 7:22 PM, William Duncan wrote:
 
Ok. Now that H.R. 396: The Traumatic Brain Injury Treatment Act has been added to the House Armed Services bill today by Congressman Sessions I have had several people ask me what that means and what the process is. Keep in mind it has typically taken 3 years to pass legislation in my other legislative projects. Persistence is key. This is year 3.
 

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