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Giving people back their lives!

HBOT in TBI

TBI / PTSD Treatment with Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Wounded Warriors with Traumatic Brain Injury and/or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder at LSUHSC

New Orleans, LA – Dr. Paul Harch, LSUHSC Clinical Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, is the principal investigator of a pilot study to determine the effectiveness of one or two courses of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in treating chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI) and TBI with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The study grew out of previous experience in treating TBI with hyperbaric oxygen therapy with improvement in symptoms and function.

Thirty participants will be recruited – half will have traumatic brain injury and half will have both traumatic brain injury and post traumatic stress disorder. The participants will undergo oral, written, and computers tests, as well as an MRI (if the participant has not had one since injury) and SPECT brain imaging. Participants will have 40 hyperbaric oxygen therapy treatments and can request up to 40 more if not improved to his/her satisfaction.

Certain conditions preclude participation including pregnancy and increased risk for rare HBOT complications.

Oxygen Provides New Hope for Brain Injured Soldiers

Getting soldiers back on their feet and fit for duty with an HBOT treatment regimen that is good government. The money that would have gone for more traditional and expensive treatments of veterans suffering from a head injury can now be used to fund other medically urgent injuries and illnesses.

So, what exactly is Hyperbric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)? HBOT treatments are similar to the treatments given to treat victims of “the bends”, the condition divers sometimes suffer. Patients are placed in a chamber filled with 100 percent oxygen at a positive pressure of one-and-a-half-times normal sea level atmospheric pressure, or what you would experience if you were SCUBA diving at a depth of around 16.5 feet. The treatment involves up to 80 one-hour sessions administered in two blocks or phases over 120 days.

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