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Pilot Study

HBOT Study: Hyperbaric therapy treats brain injuries

 

Study: Hyperbaric therapy treats brain injuries

2TheAdvocate.comBy ELLYN COUVILLION

Advocate staff writer
Published: Mar 16, 2010

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Promising results from an LSU pilot study that treated veterans suffering traumatic brain injury with hyperbaric oxygen therapy have led to a national trial that will be launched in the coming weeks.

Dr. Paul Harch, a clinical associate professor with the LSU Interim Public Hospital in New Orleans, presented the cases of 15 military veterans during a meeting of the Eighth World Congress of the International Brain Injury Association in Washington, D.C. The cases all involved veterans who were helped by the treatments.

On Monday, Harch participated in a teleconference to explain the treatment process and trial results to journalists.

To date, Harch has treated nearly 40 veterans suffering from traumatic brain injury, usually as a result of explosions, with the hyperbaric oxygen therapy originally developed to help deep-sea divers suffering from brain decompression illness.

Pediatric Cerebral Palsy treated by 1.5 ATA hyperbaric oxygen therapy, a pilot study

Kevin Barrett, M.D., F.A.C.P. Ð Professor of Hyperbaric Medicine
University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA

Abstract

Authors: Kevin F. Barrett M.D., Kevan P. Corson CHt, Jon T. Mader, M.D.

Title: Pediatric Cerebral Palsy treated by 1.5 ATA hyperbaric oxygen therapy, a pilot study.

Objective: To determine if 1.5 ATA hyperbaric oxygen therapy can ameliorate the neurologic deficits associated with pediatric cerebral palsy.

LSU will study brain injury treatments - Veterans Pilot Study

The Advocate
Baton Rouge, LA, Newspaper
February 6, 2009

Dr. Paul Harch, an LSU Health Sciences Center emergency medicine professor, is starting a pilot study on treating people with chronic traumatic brain and posttraumatic stress disorder, according to a statement from LSU Health Sciences Center.

The study will examine 30 participants, half with traumatic brain injury and half with traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder, the statement says.